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  • Unger Stingray Wins Innovation Award 14/12/2016
    PRESS RELEASE : Unger wins Innovation Award Unger Stingray shines all around. Solingen/Chicago – Unger was presented with the Innovation Award at the international cleaning trade fair ISSA/Interclean North America.  The Unger Stingray indoor window cleaning system managed to impress the exclusive jury and won the coveted award in the Supplies and Accessories […]
    Karl Robinson
  • Winterize 13/12/2016
    It's official....winter is here! You spent a lot of money on your pure water window cleaning system this year. Watch the video below for some tips on getting it winterized and tuned up for next season!© HTTP://WWW.ROBINSON-SOLUTIONS.BLOGSPOT.COM […]
    Jessica Ames

Health and Safety

ProFlex® 818OD Thermal Waterproof Gloves with OutDry®

Ergodyne Proflex 818OD Thermal Waterproof Gloves

 

Wet hands and it’s below zero – No fun right? 

          You’ve tried all kinds of gloves;

                   ones that are waterproof but let the water in,

                           ones that stink and make your hands smell bad,

                                        ones that fall apart after a week,

                       ….and yes, the ones that make you look like a scuba diver!

 

 

Finally, could we have found the perfect gloves for window cleaners?

  

* 40g 3M™ Thinsulate™ insulation
* OutDry® waterproof, windproof breathable bonded membrane
* Durable synthetic leather with PVC reinforced palm & fingers
* Breathable spandex back with foam knuckle pad
* Nylon/Spandex cuff with low-profile closure
* Terry thumb brow wipe

 

We think so…

 

 

 

 

Get a pair of ProFlex® 818OD Thermal Waterproof Gloves while we still have them ‘on hand’.

(Price includes taxes and shipping to UK mainland)


Sizes Available




 

Pre-use Ladder Safety Inspections For Window Cleaners

At Browns Ladders, we want to give you a quick guide to carrying out pre-use window cleaning ladder safety inspections.

Hundreds of workers are killed or seriously injured ever year from falling off ladders while cleaning windows – and sometimes it’s down to a faulty ladder. That’s why you should carry out inspections every time carry out a window cleaning job.

Why is it important to carry out ladder safety inspections?

Since ladders are just everyday objects, it’s easy to take them for granted. But like any work equipment, people must be trained and competent in order to use them safely.

It’s recommended that you have them thoroughly checked by a competent person at least every 6 months. You or your window cleaning employees must also carry out pre-use ladder safety inspections before using the equipment.

Pre-use ladder safety checks before window cleaning

1. Stiles

Make sure the stiles are not dented, splintered or creased. Any deformed or stiles are a sign your ladder may snap or bend.

2. Feet

Are they feet worn, damaged or missing? That’s a recipe for disaster. You need to be able to rest the feet on the surface without it wobbling.

3. Steps and rungs

Missing splintered or bent steps and rungs weaken the ladder. It may cause it to collapse while in use

4. Side Stays, braces or handrails

If they are bent, loose or damaged or not firmly attached, you definitely need to check them properly.

5. The platform

Again, if this is bent, or rivets aren’t attached properly, they’ll be trouble because the structural integrity will be compromised. Also, check the platform’s support bar is not compromised in any way

6. General ladder/stepladder inspections

Check the entire ladder/stepladder for cracks, loose rivets, and splinters, ensuring it’s on a level surface and that the steps are clean & dry – because of wear or due to spills in prior use.

7. Paint on ladders

Don’t paint your ladders or use ones they are already painted – it covers up defects.

8. Safe Working Load 

Even if the ladder looks ok…check its load capacity before cleaning the windows – and stay well within that range.

Ladder safety rules for window cleaning

Ladder Safety RulesAre you an independent window cleaner? Or are you a homeowner planning to clean your windows? Well, unless you own a big business, it’s likely that you won’t be able to afford expensive access equipment – so you’ll be using a good old-fashioned ladder But wait…don’t just jump on your ladder and start cleaning – There’s a whole host of ladder safety rules to consider.

Did you know that there are several falls from ladder related deaths every year as well as being a major cause of serious injuries? Don’t worry – our friends at Browns Ladders are here with some easy-to-follow rules to keep you safe while window cleaning using ladders.

 

Continue reading

How do I write a Window Cleaning Risk Assessment?

Health and Safety Documents Kit for Window CleanersWhat is a Risk Assessment?

A risk assessment is an evaluation of risks and consequences involved in carrying out a certain task and what controls you will put in place to minimize the risks.
You carry out a risk assessment every time you cross the road, pull out at a junction or set up your pole or ladders.

Obviously to cross the road you don’t need to write a risk assessment! The situation and hence the risk assessment is dynamic and changes continuously. However, the same principle of evaluating the risks involved and coming to conclusions as to the course of action required provide the basis for creating a risk assessment.

Why Carry Out a Risk Assessment?

Risk assessment is not an option. It is a requirement of the management of health and safety at work regulations 1999. Serious problems can arise if an accident occurs and no risk assessment has been carried out. This is particularly true if you have employees.

Many commercial customers may request that you provide a written risk assessment, but even if they don’t, it’s good commercial practice to provide one. It will enhance the customers esteem for you as a professional and more than that it will protect you from and your business from criminal and civil court action. Obviously the main benefit of working in harmony with the findings of a risk assessment is that you and your employees will be safer at work.

How Do I Carry Out A Risk Assessment?

A risk assessment therefore must be specific to the site involved. It’s no good just copying one already prepared because the risks may be different. Risk assessment boils down to basic common sense. Documenting the findings of a risk assessment need not be overly complicates. The health and safety template kit shown above includes an example risk assessment and forms which make documenting a risk assessment very simple. However, if you wish to create your own, here are some guidelines as what it should include.

Risk Assessments and Method Statements should be site specific.

There are 5 stages in carrying out a risk assessment.

1. Identify the hazards involved.

The first step in assessing risk is obviously to identify the potential hazards.
Write a list of all the potential hazards that you can think of related to each particular task.

2. Decide who is at risk and how.

Next to each risk on your list, jot down who is at risk and how. eg. is it the person working or is it the general public? Why are they at particular risk?

3. Evaluate the risks and decide on what precautions are necessary.

This is where you need to decide how great the risk is. If the risk is high then something should be done to minimise the risk before work continues. These preventative measures are called controls. What controls are in place to reduce the risk?

To evaluate the risk first ask yourself how likely is it that an accident will occur as a result of the identified risks for each task. Using a system of scoring from 1 – 5 is a common way system of evaluation. The higher the number, the higher the likelihood and therefore the greater the risk. For example:

Likelihood

1 = Remote. (Very unlikely to happen)
2 = Unlikely. (May happen on rare occasions)
3 = Likely. (May happen once a year)
4 = Very likely. (Could occur several times a year)
5 = Certain. (Sure to happen at any time)

Now that we have an idea of how likely an accident is as a result of the risk, we need to determine what kind of consequences would result from the potential accident.

Consequences

1 = Minor Injury
2 = Incapacity to work
3 = Major Injury
4 = Fatality
5 = Multiple fatality

The risk can now be evaluated by using the formula shown below:

Risk Evaluation = Likelihood x Consequences

By evaluating the severity of the risk we can decide what controls, if any need to be put in place to reduce the risk to an acceptable level.

1 – 5  =  Very Low. (No further action required)
5 – 10 =  Low. (Controls to minimise risk should be monitored)
10 – 15 = Medium (Controls must be put in place to reduce risk)
15 – 20 = High. (Urgent action is required to reduce risk)
20 – 25 = Very High. (Work should cease until the risk has been reduced)

Control measures could involve the following:

Elimination. (eg. risk of fall from height from ladder: Using a water fed pole instead of ladders)
Substitution. (eg. risk of fall from height: Using a MEWP rather than portable ladders)
Reduction. (eg. risk of falling from ladder: Using a ladder stability device)
Isolation (eg. using MEWP in front of a hotel: Isolate area with barriers or tape)
Procedure (eg. trip hazzard from trailing hoses in front of hotel entrance: Use safety signs)
PPE -Personal Protective Equipment (eg. using MEWP at height: Wear a harness in cradle)
Discipline (eg. has adequate training been given?)

4. Record your findings and put them into practise.

Your findings should now be documented and more importantly you will need to act in harmony with the findings of your risk assessment by putting the necessary controls in place.
A risk assessment template showing various common hazards and risks involved with window cleaning thatyou can use to adapt to be site specific is available to download.

5. Review the risk assessment regularly and update it if necessary.

Risk assessments need to be reviewed regularly. Set a date when you need to review it by. When you review the risk assessment look for changes in the working environment that affect the risk assessment. Are there new dangers? Are the ground conditions the same? Update the risk assessment accordingly.

 




 

 

Health and Safety Documents
Template Kit

Only £20.00
Download Today

Employers have many responsibilities. These documents make fulfilling them a little easier. Includes Risk Assessment and Method Statement templates and examples as well as various policies. 

 

 

 

 

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