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Window Cleaning News

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  • Unger Stingray Wins Innovation Award 14/12/2016
    PRESS RELEASE : Unger wins Innovation Award Unger Stingray shines all around. Solingen/Chicago – Unger was presented with the Innovation Award at the international cleaning trade fair ISSA/Interclean North America.  The Unger Stingray indoor window cleaning system managed to impress the exclusive jury and won the coveted award in the Supplies and Accessories […]
    Karl Robinson
  • Winterize 13/12/2016
    It's official....winter is here! You spent a lot of money on your pure water window cleaning system this year. Watch the video below for some tips on getting it winterized and tuned up for next season!© HTTP://WWW.ROBINSON-SOLUTIONS.BLOGSPOT.COM […]
    Jessica Ames

Admin

Water fed poles crash course

This water fed poles crash course will give you a  glimpse at what is on the market and the various features of the poles.

Check out the Play List below to view individually or click Play All above to watch them all. 

 

Things to consider when considering which water fed pole to buy:

  • Length of the pole.
    Don’t just look at the extended length for the job required. When the pole is closed will it fit in your van or car comfortably or will you need to put it on the roof rack? How easy is it for you to reach the clamps when extending and collapsing?
  • Weight of the pole
    This is especially important for the longer poles used for high work. For short bursts of high work a heavier pole may be fine but for extended periods of time  a lighter pole is important. Not only will you work faster and in more comfort but your back and shoulders will thank you for it at the end of the day.
  • Rigidity of the pole.
    A rigid pole is easier to control although some flexibility is required to reduce breakage. A water fed pole with too much bend will quickly sap your energy.
  • Material of the pole.
    Carbon fibre poles are very light and rigid.  However they can break more easily if treated without due respect. Glass fibre or aluminium is a heavier material but more resistant. Some poles combine the materials taking advantage of both. These are called ‘hybrid’ poles.
  • Usage.
    Will the pole be used by yourself or by employees? Will they treat the pole with care? If it likely to be thrown around then a glass fibre or aluminium pole may be a more durable option.
  • Versatility
    Some people like a collection of specific poles – one for every kind of job. Others choose one or two poles that are comfortable to use for a wide range of jobs.  
  • Modular or telescopic?
    Usually a modular pole will have an external pole hose. A bag or trolley is often provided so that you can add and remove sections as needed. The advantage of modular poles is that they weigh less not having clamps on them and the fact that you only use and carry the length of pole needed. However, if you are happy to carry the extra weight an extendable  telescopic pole is less fiddly and is quicker to use. If you choose modular how do the pieces connect? Heavy mechanisms may weigh as much as clamps. Tapered push fits are prone to getting stuck together. Getting them separated is possible but not easy!
  • Price and budget
    Obviously a key factor for most of us is the depth and resources of our pocket. Weigh your options carefully. Buying a cheaper pole that doesn’t tick all your boxes could end up costing you more.  Likely you will end up having to buy a different pole in the end spending again.

 

If you are thinking of buying a new water fed pole or just want to know what’s out there on the market then you will love this playlist I put together…

Most of the videos shown in the playlist are of actual water fed pole manufacturers demonstrating and explaining  the selling points of their products.

Click here to watch these videos and get a glimpse at what water fed poles are on the market right now and their various features.

 

 

 

Enjoy….

 

 

Water Fed Pole Reviews – Rigidity Comparison Test


 

This
These helpful water fed pole reviews were created by J. Racenstein . They compare the rigidity of a range of water fed poles carried in their store. The water fed pole reviews are in the range of 25-32ft.
Poles in this video include the Ionic Grafter and the Ionic Grafter Plus.  The Gardiner CLX (not the Xtreme), the Unger nLites in both Hybrid and Full Carbon Fiber Model and their very own 3-Star branded poles also in Hybrid and full Carbon Fibre.
For those of you disappointed not to see the Gardiners Super Lite Xtreme in the line up, here’s another video showing the rigidity of the Superlite Xtreme. 
 



Unger indoor window cleaning kit overview

The Unger indoor window cleaning kit. Great for maintenance cleans.

Unger nLite Brush Overview and Demonstration


A brief demonstration of the Unger nLite brush for water fed poles.



New Unger nLite Review


Become a Contributor to this site and let us know your personal reviews of the new Unger nLite water fed pole.

Gardiner Poles SLX Xtreme Review

 

 

 

How do I write a Window Cleaning Risk Assessment?

Health and Safety Documents Kit for Window CleanersWhat is a Risk Assessment?

A risk assessment is an evaluation of risks and consequences involved in carrying out a certain task and what controls you will put in place to minimize the risks.
You carry out a risk assessment every time you cross the road, pull out at a junction or set up your pole or ladders.

Obviously to cross the road you don’t need to write a risk assessment! The situation and hence the risk assessment is dynamic and changes continuously. However, the same principle of evaluating the risks involved and coming to conclusions as to the course of action required provide the basis for creating a risk assessment.

Why Carry Out a Risk Assessment?

Risk assessment is not an option. It is a requirement of the management of health and safety at work regulations 1999. Serious problems can arise if an accident occurs and no risk assessment has been carried out. This is particularly true if you have employees.

Many commercial customers may request that you provide a written risk assessment, but even if they don’t, it’s good commercial practice to provide one. It will enhance the customers esteem for you as a professional and more than that it will protect you from and your business from criminal and civil court action. Obviously the main benefit of working in harmony with the findings of a risk assessment is that you and your employees will be safer at work.

How Do I Carry Out A Risk Assessment?

A risk assessment therefore must be specific to the site involved. It’s no good just copying one already prepared because the risks may be different. Risk assessment boils down to basic common sense. Documenting the findings of a risk assessment need not be overly complicates. The health and safety template kit shown above includes an example risk assessment and forms which make documenting a risk assessment very simple. However, if you wish to create your own, here are some guidelines as what it should include.

Risk Assessments and Method Statements should be site specific.

There are 5 stages in carrying out a risk assessment.

1. Identify the hazards involved.

The first step in assessing risk is obviously to identify the potential hazards.
Write a list of all the potential hazards that you can think of related to each particular task.

2. Decide who is at risk and how.

Next to each risk on your list, jot down who is at risk and how. eg. is it the person working or is it the general public? Why are they at particular risk?

3. Evaluate the risks and decide on what precautions are necessary.

This is where you need to decide how great the risk is. If the risk is high then something should be done to minimise the risk before work continues. These preventative measures are called controls. What controls are in place to reduce the risk?

To evaluate the risk first ask yourself how likely is it that an accident will occur as a result of the identified risks for each task. Using a system of scoring from 1 – 5 is a common way system of evaluation. The higher the number, the higher the likelihood and therefore the greater the risk. For example:

Likelihood

1 = Remote. (Very unlikely to happen)
2 = Unlikely. (May happen on rare occasions)
3 = Likely. (May happen once a year)
4 = Very likely. (Could occur several times a year)
5 = Certain. (Sure to happen at any time)

Now that we have an idea of how likely an accident is as a result of the risk, we need to determine what kind of consequences would result from the potential accident.

Consequences

1 = Minor Injury
2 = Incapacity to work
3 = Major Injury
4 = Fatality
5 = Multiple fatality

The risk can now be evaluated by using the formula shown below:

Risk Evaluation = Likelihood x Consequences

By evaluating the severity of the risk we can decide what controls, if any need to be put in place to reduce the risk to an acceptable level.

1 – 5  =  Very Low. (No further action required)
5 – 10 =  Low. (Controls to minimise risk should be monitored)
10 – 15 = Medium (Controls must be put in place to reduce risk)
15 – 20 = High. (Urgent action is required to reduce risk)
20 – 25 = Very High. (Work should cease until the risk has been reduced)

Control measures could involve the following:

Elimination. (eg. risk of fall from height from ladder: Using a water fed pole instead of ladders)
Substitution. (eg. risk of fall from height: Using a MEWP rather than portable ladders)
Reduction. (eg. risk of falling from ladder: Using a ladder stability device)
Isolation (eg. using MEWP in front of a hotel: Isolate area with barriers or tape)
Procedure (eg. trip hazzard from trailing hoses in front of hotel entrance: Use safety signs)
PPE -Personal Protective Equipment (eg. using MEWP at height: Wear a harness in cradle)
Discipline (eg. has adequate training been given?)

4. Record your findings and put them into practise.

Your findings should now be documented and more importantly you will need to act in harmony with the findings of your risk assessment by putting the necessary controls in place.
A risk assessment template showing various common hazards and risks involved with window cleaning thatyou can use to adapt to be site specific is available to download.

5. Review the risk assessment regularly and update it if necessary.

Risk assessments need to be reviewed regularly. Set a date when you need to review it by. When you review the risk assessment look for changes in the working environment that affect the risk assessment. Are there new dangers? Are the ground conditions the same? Update the risk assessment accordingly.

 




 

 

Health and Safety Documents
Template Kit

Only £20.00
Download Today

Employers have many responsibilities. These documents make fulfilling them a little easier. Includes Risk Assessment and Method Statement templates and examples as well as various policies. 

 

 

 

 

Who is the new face @ Facelift?

Mike Howard - The New Face of FaceliftYou’ll recognise him as Mike Howard formerly export manager at Brodex Machine Services, now heading up Facelift Cleaning Systems. Mike who has been given free rein to develop the brand, commented on his new role, ’Facelift has an excellent worldwide reputation, I can’t wait to push the new @ Facelift concept for window cleaners, it’s an absolute dream come true!!’

The new Facelift Cleaning Systems concept and products will have the backing and support network of Window Cleaning Warehouse, well known throughout the industry.

Steve Fox, MD at Facelift Cleaning Systems said, ‘After buying Facelift last year we have spent months on product development and needed the right guy on board to launch the exciting new range, Mike MASSIVELY fitted the bill’.

 

info@faceliftcleaning.com

Twitter: @FaceliftSystems

CARPEX / WINDEX 2012 have been cancelled.

 

Owing to the greatly enhanced marketing opportunity offered by the Cleaning Show 2013, which is co-locating with the IMHX International Materials Handling Show, several traditional Carpex/Windex exhibitors have elected to use a greater percentage and in some cases all of their marketing budget for this event.

Visitor numbers at the Cleaning Show 2013 are expected to significantly increase thanks to the co-location with IMHX, making this an event that no serious supplier to the cleaning and allied markets can afford to miss.

Few companies wish to attend both Carpex/Windex and the Cleaning Show 2013, and as a consequence Carpex/Windex 2012 has been cancelled.

The next Carpex/Windex exhibition will therefore take place in 2014.

FREE Websites for Window Cleaners!

 

Free websites for window cleaners

Studio Arts are the leading UK based web design company specialising in providing websites for window cleaning companies.

To view some of the website designs available you can visit their site by clicking the picture above or visit the Window Cleaning Services directory which is an exclusive directory of websites already designed for clients.

 

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